Lancaster

The Robert Gillow Pub
64 Market Street
Lancaster
LA1 1HP
01524 36092
 
First Wednesday of the month at 7.30pm
    
 

Everyone is welcome at Lancaster's Cafe Scientifique - whether you are keen to discuss or just listen. See you soon.

If you fancy presenting at one of the events please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

    
Mark Cutter
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Michael Whitfield; Beth Penrose; Chris Englefield
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7th August

 




 

Recent speakers   


 

Wednesday 5th June 2013

Your Nitrogen Footprint

Sarah Dale

 

 

You are probably familiar with carbon footprinting - but did you know that you can calculate your nitrogen footprint too? Nitrogen is used for fertilising crops and this fertiliser takes energy to produce. 

 

 


 

Wednesday May 1st 2013
Radiation: Friend or foe?  
Chris Englefield

We all know that radiation is dangerous, don’t we?  It is, but is it quite as bad as its press suggests?  In fact we live in and have evolved in a naturally radioactive world.  On a day to day basis, radiation is used to diagnose and treat illness, as an energy source, and to make critical safety checks in construction projects. It can also be used to kill on a huge scale.

Regulation protects people and the environment from harmful side effects of beneficial and illegal uses of radiation.

 


Wed 3rd April 2013
The New Psychiatrists' Bible
Rachel Cooper 

Whether you count as mentally disordered depends on whether your behaviour fits one of the categories included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM), the classification of mental disorders that is published by the American Psychiatric Association, but increasingly used world-wide. A new version of the DSM is due to be published this May and will redraw the boundaries between normality and mental disorder. This talk will examine some of the controversies. Critics worry that the DSM-5 is set to make tantrum-prone children, eccentric adolescents, rapists, and grievers, diagnosable. How should the boundaries between the normal and the pathological be fixed? Is it right that American psychiatrists get to draw up a manual that has influence world-wide, and how do decisions get made?

 

 


 

Five loaves and two fishes: can local food feed the world?

Beccy Whittle

With the world’s population projected to reach 9 billion by 2050 there is talk of a global food security crisis. Across the globe, a range of initiatives are taking place in an attempt to avert this crisis, from scientists working to develop crops that will be more resistant to the impacts of climate change, through to the development of new, hi-tech forms of urban farming which could see food being grown in disused office blocks. But what about smaller, more local and community oriented ‘grow your own’ initiatives – such as the rise of urban foraging, community and ‘guerrilla gardening’? Such initiatives are often overlooked because the volume of food that they produce is relatively small. However, I’ll argue that they remain a vital component of food security, since they have the potential to transform the ways in which we relate to the environment and each other...

 
 
 


February 6th 2013

Keeping research real: science for social change

Anne Toomey

We know that conservation is as much about people as it is about biodiversity; all ecosystems are influenced by people and conservation is dependent on managing, appreciating, and involving people across all walks of life. But how can we best involve communities to participate in this process?  How can we ensure that the scientific results are relevant for decision-makers?  This talk will explore questions surrounding the existing gap between science and management in conservation, taking an in-depth look at the case of doing ecological research in the most biodiverse place on the planet: Madidi National Park, Bolivia.

 


Richard Bardgett spoke onThe vital importance of soil’ at the Café Scientifique in January.

 


 

Dec 5th 2012

Science and Religion: Is it a Phoney War?

Alan Gillies


 

Wednesday November 7th 2012

Slaughtering the Amazon

Erika Berenguer